A History of Collage Animation V

Length: 72′

Earmarked for Collision is the most extensive retrospective of collage animation presented to date. The multi-part program features the pioneers (Robert Breer, Harry Smith, Stan Vanderbeek, Sandor Reisenbuchler, Terry Gilliam, Larry Jordan), the modern masters (Lewis Klahr, Osbert Parker, Janie Geiser, Martha Colburn, Winston Hacking) along with an assortment of ‘one hit wonders’ by George Griffin, Theodore Ushev and others.

Un miracle

Directed by: Robert Breer, Pontus Hultén
Short synopsis:

An early demonstration of Breer's Dadaist humour: a cut-out, collaged Pope Pius XII taken from the pages of Paris Match juggles with balls, then his head, then goes off to Paradise.

Št. 11: Zrcalne animacije / No. 11: Mirror Animations

Directed by: Harry Smith
Short synopsis:

Cut up animation and collage technique synchronized to the jazz of Thelonious Monk’s Mysterioso.

Nekoč v davnih časih / Byl sobie raz / Once upon a Time

Directed by: Jan Lenica, Walerian Borowczyk
Short synopsis:

While not the first cut out animation, Once Upon a Time is without a doubt one of the most innovative. In effect, Borowczyk and Lenica transformed the economy, wit and intelligence of the Polish poster into cinema. It is also notable for a groundbreaking electro-acoustic soundtrack courtesy of the Experimental Studio of Polish Radio.

Inšpektorjeva vrnitev domov / Inspektor se vratio kući / The Inspector is Back!

Directed by: Vatroslav Mimica
Short synopsis:

An inspector walks the streets of the town, carefully trying to avoid danger. At home he washes his feet and reads the newspaper. Suddenly he notices a fingerprint starting to run away. The inspector stalks its trail all over town…

Živetiumreti / Breathdeath

Directed by: Stan VanDerBeek
Short synopsis:

Breathdeath is a collage-animation film that presents a poignant commentary on how both life and death have been affected by mass media in the postwar period. Spliced between scenes of people dancing the Twist and drawings of skulls and skeletons are fighter jets taking off, soldiers marching, a handgun firing, several explosions, and an atomic mushroom cloud. The frenetic pace of the film creates a cavalcade of juxtapositions and animations that reference such film icons as the Lumière brothers, Luis Buñuel, Charlie Chaplin, Buster Keaton, Harpo Marx, and Marilyn Monroe.

Monolog / A monológ / Monologue

Directed by: Pannónia Filmstúdió
Short synopsis:

This collage “memoir” film is a subjective overview of the history of Hungary in the 20th century. A young woman from the 1960s takes a critical look at the life of her grandparents (living during the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy) and parents (living during the interwar period).

Naša gospa, kraljica oble / Our Lady of the Sphere

Directed by: Larry Jordan
Short synopsis:

“Perhaps Jordan's most exquisitely perfect creation, Our Lady of the Sphere is a color collage of rococo imagery juxtaposed with symbols of the space age. The images metamorphose, transmute, interpenetrate and otherwise change with the fluid effervescence of bubbles rising out of water, punctuated by sudden flashes of light, alarm buzzers and abrupt visual surprises. It is a mystical, jewel-like creation, like a Joseph Cornell box come to life.”
- Thomas Albright, San Francisco Chronicle

Esperanza / Esperantsa / Esperanza

Directed by: Ivan Andonov
Short synopsis:

There are different theories about the origin of man, so we assume that the liquid the bartender pours into the child's pot becomes the reason for the birth of our character. Along with him, hope is born – hope that it is possible that in the future this child will become Rembrandt or Picasso, Shakespeare or Tolstoy, maybe Einstein. But the child grows up and love and hope for happiness come. After the wedding cake comes the desire for more money, a car and a young mistress. The screen is filled with various “horns”, “triangles”, and “beating hearts”. Then comes the disturbing X-ray, and with it the hope for a cure, for a new medicine. And finally, a ballerina appears. Her swan dance reminds us of the missed opportunities, of all the hopes we have destroyed ourselves.

Cineblatz

Directed by: Jeff Keen
Short synopsis:

As strenuously obsessive about his work as Harry Smith, Brighton-based Jeff Keen was an important figure on the British underground scene of happenings and “expanded cinema”. Cineblatz is a retinal riot, a rapid-fire cacophony of scrawled drawings, roughly clipped photographs from magazine advertisements and newspaper stories, and 3D objects like the plastic toys that melt before our eyes. Violence convulses the screen: not only are there endless explosions and savage acts, but the materials out of which the film is montaged are burned black or stained with soiling splurges of colour.

A History of Collage Animation V

Length: 72′

Earmarked for Collision is the most extensive retrospective of collage animation presented to date. The multi-part program features the pioneers (Robert Breer, Harry Smith, Stan Vanderbeek, Sandor Reisenbuchler, Terry Gilliam, Larry Jordan), the modern masters (Lewis Klahr, Osbert Parker, Janie Geiser, Martha Colburn, Winston Hacking) along with an assortment of ‘one hit wonders’ by George Griffin, Theodore Ushev and others.

Un miracle

Directed by: Robert Breer, Pontus Hultén
Short synopsis:

An early demonstration of Breer's Dadaist humour: a cut-out, collaged Pope Pius XII taken from the pages of Paris Match juggles with balls, then his head, then goes off to Paradise.

Short synopsis:

Cut up animation and collage technique synchronized to the jazz of Thelonious Monk’s Mysterioso.

Nekoč v davnih časih / Byl sobie raz / Once upon a Time

Directed by: Jan Lenica, Walerian Borowczyk
Short synopsis:

While not the first cut out animation, Once Upon a Time is without a doubt one of the most innovative. In effect, Borowczyk and Lenica transformed the economy, wit and intelligence of the Polish poster into cinema. It is also notable for a groundbreaking electro-acoustic soundtrack courtesy of the Experimental Studio of Polish Radio.

Short synopsis:

An inspector walks the streets of the town, carefully trying to avoid danger. At home he washes his feet and reads the newspaper. Suddenly he notices a fingerprint starting to run away. The inspector stalks its trail all over town…

Živetiumreti / Breathdeath

Directed by: Stan VanDerBeek
Short synopsis:

Breathdeath is a collage-animation film that presents a poignant commentary on how both life and death have been affected by mass media in the postwar period. Spliced between scenes of people dancing the Twist and drawings of skulls and skeletons are fighter jets taking off, soldiers marching, a handgun firing, several explosions, and an atomic mushroom cloud. The frenetic pace of the film creates a cavalcade of juxtapositions and animations that reference such film icons as the Lumière brothers, Luis Buñuel, Charlie Chaplin, Buster Keaton, Harpo Marx, and Marilyn Monroe.

Monolog / A monológ / Monologue

Directed by: Pannónia Filmstúdió
Short synopsis:

This collage “memoir” film is a subjective overview of the history of Hungary in the 20th century. A young woman from the 1960s takes a critical look at the life of her grandparents (living during the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy) and parents (living during the interwar period).

Short synopsis:

“Perhaps Jordan's most exquisitely perfect creation, Our Lady of the Sphere is a color collage of rococo imagery juxtaposed with symbols of the space age. The images metamorphose, transmute, interpenetrate and otherwise change with the fluid effervescence of bubbles rising out of water, punctuated by sudden flashes of light, alarm buzzers and abrupt visual surprises. It is a mystical, jewel-like creation, like a Joseph Cornell box come to life.”
- Thomas Albright, San Francisco Chronicle

Esperanza / Esperantsa / Esperanza

Directed by: Ivan Andonov
Short synopsis:

There are different theories about the origin of man, so we assume that the liquid the bartender pours into the child's pot becomes the reason for the birth of our character. Along with him, hope is born – hope that it is possible that in the future this child will become Rembrandt or Picasso, Shakespeare or Tolstoy, maybe Einstein. But the child grows up and love and hope for happiness come. After the wedding cake comes the desire for more money, a car and a young mistress. The screen is filled with various “horns”, “triangles”, and “beating hearts”. Then comes the disturbing X-ray, and with it the hope for a cure, for a new medicine. And finally, a ballerina appears. Her swan dance reminds us of the missed opportunities, of all the hopes we have destroyed ourselves.

Cineblatz

Directed by: Jeff Keen
Short synopsis:

As strenuously obsessive about his work as Harry Smith, Brighton-based Jeff Keen was an important figure on the British underground scene of happenings and “expanded cinema”. Cineblatz is a retinal riot, a rapid-fire cacophony of scrawled drawings, roughly clipped photographs from magazine advertisements and newspaper stories, and 3D objects like the plastic toys that melt before our eyes. Violence convulses the screen: not only are there endless explosions and savage acts, but the materials out of which the film is montaged are burned black or stained with soiling splurges of colour.